CFP: Sound and Bodies in the World

The 8th Annual Graduate Music Society Conference
February 28, 2015
Boston University

We live in a world rich with soundscapes. Whether it is produced by bird calls, machines, the string section of an orchestra, or one’s own voice, sound around us reflect the environment we live in. How we choose to interact with sounds often reveals certain ways of being and knowing in the world. Our bodies are the first receivers of sounds, physically encountering sound waves through a multiplicity of sense. How our brains interpret sound is rooted in bodily and cognitive realities; this is especially true of musical sound, which is shaped by context, acoustics, language, and cultural preconditioning.

 

This conference seeks to encourage interdisciplinary conversation between musicological scholarship and areas ranging from sociology, the humanities, environmental and sound studies, and medicine. We encourage proposals exploring the relationship between sound environments and bodily realities, including (but not limited to) issues of gender, race, sexuality, bodily differences and identities, disability, illness, and wellness.

 

We welcome abstracts for tradition 20-minute papers, 5-minute ‘Ignite’ sessions, and poster presentations. Ignite sessions (native to technology and social media communities) essentialize research into a five-minute take accompanied by twenty PowerPoint slides, creating a dynamic, highly focused presentation. (For more information on the Ignite format, contact Jason McCool, jmccool at bu.edu.) Abstracts of no more than 250 words are due January 5th to John Forrestal, johndf at bu.edu.

 

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Iverson from the University of Iowa

Advertisements

NETWORKED BODIES: Digital Performance Weekender

 

NETWORKED BODIES
Digital Performance Weekender
Friday 7 – Sunday 9 November 2014
Watermans
 
Programme of events
 
Networks are at the heart of how we live today. Networks generate transnational zones of action, bring together communities, circulate knowledge and information, expand spheres of influence, contaminate ideas, germinate exchanges, foster innovation, and facilitate distribution of power. However, networks are unfairly distributed and closely monitored. Geopolitical injustices and dominant political and economic forces mean that networks can foster segregation, facilitate hyper-centralized forms of citizen surveillance and control, fragment living space and experience. These developments of the network society generate social tensions, which invest the task of understanding networks in their many manifestations -including cultural ones- with social and political urgency.
 
Networks, despite many past promises of disembodiment and internationalism through the obsolescence of both bodies and geographical boundaries – promises now widely perceived themselves as obsolete – are still experienced by subjects that remain both embodied and geographically situated (Cohen, 2012: 11) As Cohen argues, not only are networks firmly connected to material bodies and physical geographies, but they also play “an increasingly significant role in constructing embodied experience” (ibid), by both empowering and configuring the “networked self” (ibid: 12).
 
In Networked Bodies at Watermans we want to explore networked performance practices with a view to considering how they transform live (embodied, disembodied and trans-bodied) performance practices. We are keen to consider the many, increasingly well documented, exciting possibilities these present to live performance, as well as their potential downsides. Speaking for the devil (so to speak), we ask: do these practices raise any ethical concerns through the use of surveillance and control, fragmentation of space and experience, alienation or even exploitation of their participants? Networked Bodies will aim to look beyond shiny appearances and into the -occasionally dirty- folds of the networks (and the bodies).
 
Curated by Maria Chatzichristodoulou (aka Maria X) and Irini Papadimitriou
 
Participating Artists: Invisible Flock, Norah Lorway, Jo Scott, Chisato Minamimura in collaboration with Nick Rothwell & body>data>space, Kate Sicchio & Nick Rothwell, Fabio Lattanzi Antinori & Louise Ashcroft, Suzon Fuks, Steve Dixon, Julian Maynard Smith (Station House Opera), Maria Oshodi (Extant), Prof. Susan Broadhurst, Daniel Ploeger, Ellen Harlizius-Kluck, Rachel Jacobs (Active Ingredient), Tim Murray-Brown & Jan Lee, Christina Papagiannouli, Evi Stamatiou, Helen Varley Jamieson, Miljana Perić & Vicki Smith, Annie Abrahams, Camille Baker, Joel Cahen, Garrett Lynch, Joseph Hyde with Phill Tew & body>data>space, Kasia Molga & Adrian Godwin, Ka Fai Choy, Jennifer Lyn MoroneT Inc, Alex May, Nina Kov in collaboration with COLLMOT Robotic Research Group directed by Pr Tamas Vicsek, Dept of Biological Physics of the Eotvos University of Budapest, Exploring Senses CIC, Stanza

Researching the body

A 3 minute intro to trans-disciplinary research into embodiment from MODE (I’m hoping to get to some of their fantastic training events soon):

MODE Blog

Authors: Carey Jewitt & Sara Price

The mode seminar on embodiment and digital technologies (03.04.14) drew an interesting interdisciplinary group together. The word cloud made from the three key words that each of the participants used to introduce themselves shows something of this mix.

word cloud embodiment

As one of the participants commented, embodiment draws together people from across a wide range of disciplines – at this particular event from sociology, art, performance, psychology, media and communication studies, literacy and education studies, human computer interaction, design, and architecture.

We explored what is meant by embodiment (embodied cognition), drawing on some theoretical ideas around the body being the ‘hub of all meaning making’ (Merleau Ponty, 1945), highlighting cognition as enacted (through sensori-motor/ action); embedded (through beingness in the environment and social and cultural contexts); and extended (through notions of offloading cognition/ manipulation/ transformation; and finally the idea of an ‘amalgamated mind’ (Rowland, 2010), where…

View original post 240 more words

CFP: Intersectionality and Technologies of the Musical Body

Many thanks to Dr Trevor Wiggins for passing this on.

Dear Colleagues,

As the deadline for SEM 2014 approaches, I am putting together a panel of paper presentations that deal with intersectionality studies in ethnomusicology with an emphasis on dance and musical movement and video that allows us to discuss issues of race, gender, sexuality and desire (among other things) in ethnographic research on and off-line.

Papers will include one by Ari Ben Mosha Gagné (Univ. of Colorado at Boulder) looking at twerking, booty-shaking and p-poppin among women as well as men in bounce music culture.  I will be presenting on research on black girls twerking on YouTube, research I introduced in my SEM 2013 presentation (thanks for all who attended). I am currently writing about my research on my blog http://kyraocity.wordpress.com.

The panel will also focus attention on the technologies of the musical body in the study of systems of oppression and/or social change relative to self-presentation and the generalized other from a sociological perspective. Presenters are strongly encouraged to use video or actual live dancing.

This is envisioned as a panel akin to the queering the pitch discourse that embraces intersectionalism in ethnomusicological studies. If you think your work fits, send it for consideration to kyraocity@gmail.com. Digital ethnomusicology studies are strongly encouraged.

Must hear from you by Jan 31 to prepare the proposals for submission.

Thank you,

Kyra Gaunt