[CFP] TaPRA 2013 | Embodied Engagement: Participatory And Immersive Performance

Performance and the Body Working Group // Performance and New Technologies Working Group

University of Glasgow and The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (RCS)
4th- 6th September 2013

 

The Performance and the Body and Performance and New Technologies Working Groups are joining forces this year to explore different bodily, aesthetic, political, ethical and economical aspects of participation in the current performance milieu. In a performance context where hierarchies of participation are being reconfigured and traditional authorial claims are under stress, new articulations of spectator/performer reciprocity can no longer be disregarded. Focusing on audience experience, we intend to examine possibilities of participant (spectators and performers) agency and empowerment within different modes of performance transaction.
According to Adrian Heathfield, contemporary performance has shifted aesthetically from ‘the optic to the haptic, from the distant to the immersive, from the static relation to the interactive’. The dialogue between the two Working Groups aims to explore the productive tensions between bodies and technologies in the development of this shift. The contested term ‘immersive’ is a rich, under-theorized concept which pulls in and works across distinct constituencies of performance. It calls upon diverse technologies to create its performance environments and promote active bodily engagement. Immersion both as an artistic intention and a perceived process is identified with concepts of viscerality, authenticity and immediacy. Yet the question remains as to how effective immersion can be in engaging audiences mentally, emotionally and corporeally.
Proposals do not need to address both issues of bodies and technologies, but might consider the following issues, though these are not exclusive:

* The bodily risk of participation
* Immersive practices as a democratisation of performance
* Spectator’s authority, authorship and agency in immersive performances
* Discomfort and fear: the ethics of enforced participation
* Sensory inscribed experiences: synaesthetic experiments of flesh
* Soundscapes: the corporeality of immersion
* Ethics of immersion in locative games, mobile interfaces, social media platforms
* Mapping and constructing hybrid, artificial and mixed-media spaces
* Temporalities of immersion
* Embodiment/Disembodiment: game space and everyday life
* Cognitive engagement: willing suspension of disbelief in performance
* ‘Passive’ and ‘active’ audiences
* Political contexts of participatory work
* Empathy and audience engagement
* Intentionality and sensual experience

Proposals
Please send a 300 word proposal, a short biographical statement, and an outline of technical requirements by 29th April 2013 to the working groups convenors.
Proposals, if accepted, may be directed into a range of presentational formats: traditional panels (with 20 minute papers); pre-circulated papers that form the basis for a short presentation and discussion; or, where appropriate, performance-based panels. While we welcome statements of preference, final decisions will be made by the working groups convenors and will be indicated at the time of acceptance.
We welcome alternative, practice-as-research or performative proposals that engage rigorously with the theme, but these must be achievable with limited resources and within a 20-30 minute time period.The convenors of the Performance and the Body Working Group are James Frieze and Lib Taylor. The convenors of the New Technologies Working Group are Martin Blain, Maria Chatzichristodoulou, and Eirini Nedelkopoulou.

 

[Event] Performance Studies Network Second International Conference

4-7 April 2013
Cambridge University

The more musicologically-inclined of you might be interested in some of the papers at the upcoming Performance Studies Network Second International Conference. Particularly:

Nicholas Cook: The Signifying Body: Hendrix, 31 August 1970, 2am
Marilyn Wyers: Shaping phrase: exploring dance movement-supported learning and advanced pianistic training
Linda T. Kaastra and David Kirsh: Embodied creativity in bassoon performance
Murphy McCaleb: Embodied Knowledge: the case of ensemble performance
Naomi Waltham-Smith: Modelling touch in musical performance using the iPad
Mats Kussner: How musicians’ and non-musicians’ approaches to gestural representations of sound and music differ: findings from a motion-capture experiment

Abstracts are available in the conference programme.

[CFP] Performance, the Body and Time in the 21st Century

26-27 June 2013
Hosted by: exist
Project Gallery
Queensland College of Art
Griffith University
226 Grey Street, South Bank Qld 4101

This two-day symposium will explore issues surrounding Performance, the Body and Time in the 21st century. How is the ever-increasing pace of technology generation affecting us as artists and audiences? How have the advances made in the 21st century changed the way we create, the way we consume and how we collaborate?

The premier exist conference will take place 26- 27 June. It will be held at the Queensland College of Art – Project Gallery, Brisbane. The Queensland College of Art, established in 1881, is one of Australia’s longest-running art and design colleges and is situated at Brisbane’s South Bank.

Proposals for papers and presentations are invited which connect with questions on the experience of Performance, the Body and Time in the 21st Century. Possible themes may include:

* Hyper-realism and the experience of time in art
* Performance and the body in time
* Utopia, the sublime, ecstasy and transcendence in art
* Digital performance and the body3d visualization and gaming in art
* Globalization and the singularity of the body in performance
* Development of art materials in the 21st century
* Connecting with digital audiences
* Durational performance in the 21st century
* Two Bodies in Space: Performing as a Duo
* Body Politics in contemporary mediatised performance
* Gender performance in mass-media culture

Conference proceedings will be produced and published online. Abstract proposals (up to 500 words) should be submitted with authors’ details provided separately, so that submissions can be reviewed, blind, by a Conference Review Panel.

Please send your proposal as a Word document attached to an email addressed to exist@live.com.au with subject exist-symposia. Please ensure that your email includes your full name, affiliation, address, email address and phone number (Please DO NOT INCLUDE THESE DETAILS WITH YOUR ABSTRACT).

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: 8th April 2013.

The Conference Review Panel aims to complete the review process by 30th April 2013.

More information here.

Publication: Experiments and Intensities

The Winchester University Press online series Experiments and Intensities is now officially launching its first two volumes.

In Volume 1, Cries from the Guts, artists working in sound explore what might be the nature of the ‘visceral’ within the sonic realm today, in pieces that range from the disturbing to the funny to the architectural.

Featured works include: Ali Cocks’ Semiotic Stomach; Mikael Eriksson’s Eating Pipe; Laura Maes’ GlisGlis; Takahashi’s Shellfish Concern’s Guts; Marco Donnarumma’s Music for Flesh II; Melanie Chilianis’ MCVox; Lawrence Upton and Benedict Taylor’s VUST! and Sirpa Jokinen’s The Hagia Sofia.

Visit http://www.experimentsandintensities.com/published/vol-1/ to check it out for free!