Researching the body

A 3 minute intro to trans-disciplinary research into embodiment from MODE (I’m hoping to get to some of their fantastic training events soon):

MODE Blog

Authors: Carey Jewitt & Sara Price

The mode seminar on embodiment and digital technologies (03.04.14) drew an interesting interdisciplinary group together. The word cloud made from the three key words that each of the participants used to introduce themselves shows something of this mix.

word cloud embodiment

As one of the participants commented, embodiment draws together people from across a wide range of disciplines – at this particular event from sociology, art, performance, psychology, media and communication studies, literacy and education studies, human computer interaction, design, and architecture.

We explored what is meant by embodiment (embodied cognition), drawing on some theoretical ideas around the body being the ‘hub of all meaning making’ (Merleau Ponty, 1945), highlighting cognition as enacted (through sensori-motor/ action); embedded (through beingness in the environment and social and cultural contexts); and extended (through notions of offloading cognition/ manipulation/ transformation; and finally the idea of an ‘amalgamated mind’ (Rowland, 2010), where…

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[Event] Stelarc: the human body is obsolete (seminar)

Seminar with Stelarc and Henk Oosterling (Erasmus University).

25 October 2013
14.00 – 17.00
Auditorium
Het Nieuwe Instituut
Museumpark, Rotterdam

 

Stelarc

“In a time of Circulating Flesh, Fractal Flesh and Phantom Flesh organs are extracted and exchanged, bodies and bits of bodies remotely generate recurring patterns of interactivity and haptic technologies generate potent physical presences of virtual flesh. Bodies are hacked, genes are mapped, prosthetics are attached and chimeras are engineered in labs. The trans-species, the trans-gendered and even the trans-human proliferate.” Stelarc

This seminar follows a presentation by Stelarc on the 24th October.

Visit V2_ for further information.

[CFP] TaPRA 2013 | Embodied Engagement: Participatory And Immersive Performance

Performance and the Body Working Group // Performance and New Technologies Working Group

University of Glasgow and The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (RCS)
4th- 6th September 2013

 

The Performance and the Body and Performance and New Technologies Working Groups are joining forces this year to explore different bodily, aesthetic, political, ethical and economical aspects of participation in the current performance milieu. In a performance context where hierarchies of participation are being reconfigured and traditional authorial claims are under stress, new articulations of spectator/performer reciprocity can no longer be disregarded. Focusing on audience experience, we intend to examine possibilities of participant (spectators and performers) agency and empowerment within different modes of performance transaction.
According to Adrian Heathfield, contemporary performance has shifted aesthetically from ‘the optic to the haptic, from the distant to the immersive, from the static relation to the interactive’. The dialogue between the two Working Groups aims to explore the productive tensions between bodies and technologies in the development of this shift. The contested term ‘immersive’ is a rich, under-theorized concept which pulls in and works across distinct constituencies of performance. It calls upon diverse technologies to create its performance environments and promote active bodily engagement. Immersion both as an artistic intention and a perceived process is identified with concepts of viscerality, authenticity and immediacy. Yet the question remains as to how effective immersion can be in engaging audiences mentally, emotionally and corporeally.
Proposals do not need to address both issues of bodies and technologies, but might consider the following issues, though these are not exclusive:

* The bodily risk of participation
* Immersive practices as a democratisation of performance
* Spectator’s authority, authorship and agency in immersive performances
* Discomfort and fear: the ethics of enforced participation
* Sensory inscribed experiences: synaesthetic experiments of flesh
* Soundscapes: the corporeality of immersion
* Ethics of immersion in locative games, mobile interfaces, social media platforms
* Mapping and constructing hybrid, artificial and mixed-media spaces
* Temporalities of immersion
* Embodiment/Disembodiment: game space and everyday life
* Cognitive engagement: willing suspension of disbelief in performance
* ‘Passive’ and ‘active’ audiences
* Political contexts of participatory work
* Empathy and audience engagement
* Intentionality and sensual experience

Proposals
Please send a 300 word proposal, a short biographical statement, and an outline of technical requirements by 29th April 2013 to the working groups convenors.
Proposals, if accepted, may be directed into a range of presentational formats: traditional panels (with 20 minute papers); pre-circulated papers that form the basis for a short presentation and discussion; or, where appropriate, performance-based panels. While we welcome statements of preference, final decisions will be made by the working groups convenors and will be indicated at the time of acceptance.
We welcome alternative, practice-as-research or performative proposals that engage rigorously with the theme, but these must be achievable with limited resources and within a 20-30 minute time period.The convenors of the Performance and the Body Working Group are James Frieze and Lib Taylor. The convenors of the New Technologies Working Group are Martin Blain, Maria Chatzichristodoulou, and Eirini Nedelkopoulou.

 

[CFP] Gender and Ability, Technology and Sound

This cross-disciplinary symposium examines the intersections of listening and ability as it relates to issues of gender and technology. Devoted to the dissemination of new unpublished research and exciting interdisciplinary encounters, the symposium will bring together leading scholars from the sciences and humanities as well as community activists to discuss political, cultural, and historical issues at the nexus of listening and ability.

The symposium will consist of invited keynote lectures, seminars, and papers sessions by leading scholars in the fields of psychology, science and technology studies (STS), and the humanities. Dr. Sandra Trehub and Dr. Mara Mills will present keynote lectures on their work in psychology and ability-technology studies, with follow up discussions planned throughout the conference. Dr. Carol Stabile will chair a panel on the challenges faced by women in the sciences and STS. There will also be a series of paper presentations with respondents from among University of Oregon’s leading faculty in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.We welcome research from a broad range of perspectives, including neurobiology, developmental psychology, music therapy, ethnomusicology, linguistics, anthropology, music perception and cognition, language acquisition, cognitive neuroscience. We interpret these fields widely, and invite scholars who engage in dialog with these fields – regardless of the discipline with which they self-identify.

Scholars of deafness like Mara Mills argue that hearing and voicing have functioned as key modes for defining and discriminating human sociality in such a way that leaves Deaf and hearing-impaired individuals on the margins of the social world. Doubtlessly, technology has played a central role both in re-inscribing and ameliorating this audist and phonocentric world. This conference invites researchers, scholars, and/or activists to participate in a conversation regarding how we think about deaf/Deaf issues historically, technologically, and futuristically. Further, we invite engaged intellectuals to combine the issues of ability and sound with other paradigms of activism and theory, such as anti-colonialism, anti-racism, and/or feminist issues.

Papers are invited that report empirical and theoretical research addressing these topics and expanding our knowledge of these intersecting fields. Researchers interested in presenting a paper should submit a 500 word abstract by  February 11, 2013 detailing 1) the main findings or argument of their papers, and b) their potential to contribute to broad conversations in the sciences and humanities around gender, technology, listening, and ability (please visit the symposium website for more details). Abstracts should be submitted to jmendoz4 .AT. uoregon.edu

Submissions will be reviewed anonymously by symposium organizers Jenny Mendoza and Bryce Peake in consultation with leading scholars in their fields. Selected papers from this event will also be submitted as part of a proposed issue on gender, sound, technology, and ability for Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology. In its first issue, Ada received over 30,000 downloads, and we look forward to expanding the exciting conversations regarding gender, new media, and technology occurring there.

[CFP] Journeys Across Media: The Body and The Digital

Postgraduate Conference
Friday 19 April 2013
University of Reading

2013 will mark the 11th anniversary of the annual Journeys Across Media (JAM) Conference for postgraduate students, organised by postgraduates working in the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at the University of Reading. JAM 2013 seeks to focus on and foster current research relating to the Body and the Digital, as today they are interactive and interdependent facets in the media of film, theatre and television; and more widely, in the areas of performance and art. It is a relationship which continues to develop and redefine cinematic, televisual and theatrical practices.

This is a call for postgraduates engaging in contemporary discourses and practices relating to the Body and the Digital, to submit papers or practice-based research for the JAM 2013 Conference. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

  • Interactivity between Digital languages and the Body
  • Sonic Representations of the Body in Digital Performance
  • The Digitized Body in Performance
  • The Role of the Body in Digital Games and Virtual Performance
  • Post-Colonial Bodies in the Contemporary Moment
  • Preparing the Body for Performance
  • Notions of Embodiment (i.e. Violent, Disabled, Explicit)
  • Traditions of Corporeally focused Film, Theatre and Television
  • Embodied Spectatorship or Audiences, and Physicality
  • Phenomenology of the Lived, Performed and Screened Body
  • The Haunted Body
  • Politics of the Body
  • Unconventional and Other Bodies

The body, its presence, perceptions and experience, are becoming increasingly underpinned and influenced by the digital age.  JAM 2013 will endeavour to open a dialogue about the relationship between the body and digital in contemporary scholarship and practice, posing many questions including: How does the body encounter digital media and how do digital media frames position the body – both in mainstream iterations, social media contexts and in art/installation/performance contexts? Furthermore, it will also be worth considering how digital technology has affected the way that humans approach unfamiliar body movement traditions, beyond regional and national borders?

JAM 2013 will provide a discussion forum for current and developing research in film, theatre, television and new media. Previous delegates have welcomed this opportunity to gain experience of presenting their work at different stages of their development, while having the opportunity to meet and form contacts with fellow postgraduate students. Furthermore, participants at JAM 2013 have the possibility of being published in the Journal of Media Practice.

Non-Presenting delegates are also very welcome to attend this conference.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS deadline: 1st February 2013
Please send a 250-word abstract for a fifteen minute paper and a 50-word biographical note to Johnmichael Rossi, Gary Cassidy, Edina Husanovic, Shelly Quirk, Matthew McFrederick at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk .

CALL FOR PRACTICE-BASED WORK deadline: 1st February 2013
Continuing from the success of last year’s JAM 2012 Conference: Time Tells, which experimented with conference structure to include live performances, film screenings and installations taking place throughout the day, we invite artists working in various mediums to propose presentations of their work, relevant to the conference theme. Please send a 250-word outline describing the piece you are proposing to present, as well as duration and any specific technical/space requirements, and a 50-word biographical note. Relevant images and links to your work would also be helpful. As outlined above please e-mail the Conference organisers at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk .

We would appreciate the distribution of this call for papers and wider promotion of this conference through your networks. Journeys Across Media is supported by the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at Reading and the Standing Conference of University Drama Departments.

For further details check out the event’s web page.

Bob Ostertag

[Event] Bob Ostertag Masterclass and Concert

Masterclass
July 13 & 14

Fee: 25 euros (including concert)
STEIM: Achtergracht 19, 1017WL Amsterdam, NL

Concert
3 Solo Sets by: Bob Ostertag, Jaap Blonk, Jonathan Reus
July 14
Charge: 5 euros
Start: 20:30
Address: STEIM: Utrechtsedwaarsstraat 134, 1017WK Amsterdam, NL

 

Bob Ostertag

 

Composer, performer, historian, instrument builder, journalist, activist, kayak instructor, Bob Ostertag’s work cannot easily be summarized or pigeon-holed. He has published 21 CDs of music, two movies, two DVDs, and three books. His writings on contemporary politics have been published on every continent and in many languages. Electronic instruments of his own design are at the cutting edge of both music and video performance technology.

The 2 day program will feature a series of lectures and intimate discussion sessions between Ostertag and the participants. On the evening of July 14, there will be a special concert by Bob, and brand new work by Jaap Blonk and Jonathan Reus.

More info is available on the STEIM website.

[Event] Soundwave ((5)) Humanities

San Francisco
5th July 2012 – 30 September 2012

 

Soundwave 5 poster

“MEDIATE Art Group is excited to announce the return of Soundwave this summer for its fifth season, entitled HUMANITIES, exploring our sonic connections to the human experience. Arguably the largest celebration of avant-art, sound and music in the Bay Area, Soundwave ((5)) HUMANITES will feature over 90 participating artists and musicians, in over 35 inspired performances, concerts, exhibits and conference panels & presentations over the span of 3 entire months.

‘These innovative artists and musicians will uncover the future of humanity from bionic brainwave instrumentations, subconscious realities, technohuman immersions, Zen-inspired performances, hybrid mythologies, new dimensions, and other artist imaginations,’ says Alan So, Soundwave Festival & Artistic Director. “

Bodies|Sounds|Technologies readers might be interested in checking out The Human Bionic at The Lab on 14th July:

The Human Bionic features innovative instrumentation using the human body that questions the boundaries between the biological and technological. Artists Cantrell, Kuhne and Stuck imagine the hybridization of humans and technology with interactive performances utilizing brainwaves, muscles, sensors and human processing to create and conduct sound. Cantrell creates ‘Sounding Body’ an audience-interactive performance event that uses brainwaves to reveal how our thoughts can take various sonic forms. Multi-media artist Kuhne conjures ‘Rebound’ using videos and sensors to activate sound and image. Stuck presents ‘Pressed’ positioning the dancer’s real body between a symbolic language that directs movement and the video record of past movement. The Human Bionic explores our physical connection to technology while raising questions as to what is at stake, and what can be lost, by organic bodies and their interrelationships as technological implements become increasingly ubiquitous and essential in our current society.

The Future Bionic looks pretty good, too; Jay Kreimer’s ‘Born Wireless’ sounds particularly fascinating and I hope to write a blog post about it soon (a naive proposition, perhaps, given that I am stuck in the UK and won’t be able to see it ‘in the flesh’). Other exciting offerings include:  The New Humanity Conference: Technohumanity at Intersection for the Arts and The Meta Bionic at The Lab (featuring work by  M+V (aka Tavis Johns & Paulina Velázquez), Guillermo Galindo, and NASSA ). For more info, check out the Soundwave ((5)) website.