NETWORKED BODIES: Digital Performance Weekender

 

NETWORKED BODIES
Digital Performance Weekender
Friday 7 – Sunday 9 November 2014
Watermans
 
Programme of events
 
Networks are at the heart of how we live today. Networks generate transnational zones of action, bring together communities, circulate knowledge and information, expand spheres of influence, contaminate ideas, germinate exchanges, foster innovation, and facilitate distribution of power. However, networks are unfairly distributed and closely monitored. Geopolitical injustices and dominant political and economic forces mean that networks can foster segregation, facilitate hyper-centralized forms of citizen surveillance and control, fragment living space and experience. These developments of the network society generate social tensions, which invest the task of understanding networks in their many manifestations -including cultural ones- with social and political urgency.
 
Networks, despite many past promises of disembodiment and internationalism through the obsolescence of both bodies and geographical boundaries – promises now widely perceived themselves as obsolete – are still experienced by subjects that remain both embodied and geographically situated (Cohen, 2012: 11) As Cohen argues, not only are networks firmly connected to material bodies and physical geographies, but they also play “an increasingly significant role in constructing embodied experience” (ibid), by both empowering and configuring the “networked self” (ibid: 12).
 
In Networked Bodies at Watermans we want to explore networked performance practices with a view to considering how they transform live (embodied, disembodied and trans-bodied) performance practices. We are keen to consider the many, increasingly well documented, exciting possibilities these present to live performance, as well as their potential downsides. Speaking for the devil (so to speak), we ask: do these practices raise any ethical concerns through the use of surveillance and control, fragmentation of space and experience, alienation or even exploitation of their participants? Networked Bodies will aim to look beyond shiny appearances and into the -occasionally dirty- folds of the networks (and the bodies).
 
Curated by Maria Chatzichristodoulou (aka Maria X) and Irini Papadimitriou
 
Participating Artists: Invisible Flock, Norah Lorway, Jo Scott, Chisato Minamimura in collaboration with Nick Rothwell & body>data>space, Kate Sicchio & Nick Rothwell, Fabio Lattanzi Antinori & Louise Ashcroft, Suzon Fuks, Steve Dixon, Julian Maynard Smith (Station House Opera), Maria Oshodi (Extant), Prof. Susan Broadhurst, Daniel Ploeger, Ellen Harlizius-Kluck, Rachel Jacobs (Active Ingredient), Tim Murray-Brown & Jan Lee, Christina Papagiannouli, Evi Stamatiou, Helen Varley Jamieson, Miljana Perić & Vicki Smith, Annie Abrahams, Camille Baker, Joel Cahen, Garrett Lynch, Joseph Hyde with Phill Tew & body>data>space, Kasia Molga & Adrian Godwin, Ka Fai Choy, Jennifer Lyn MoroneT Inc, Alex May, Nina Kov in collaboration with COLLMOT Robotic Research Group directed by Pr Tamas Vicsek, Dept of Biological Physics of the Eotvos University of Budapest, Exploring Senses CIC, Stanza

[CFP] Metabody: call for papers and projects in metaperformance

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Call for papers and projects for the first events of the ongoing 5-year metabody research project. Please see the calls below.

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Metabody Conference Series 1 – Metahuman/Metaformance Studies 2013:

CALL FOR PAPERS LINK

Multiplicities in Motion:

Affects, Embodiment and the Reversal of Cybernetics.
3.000 Years of Posthuman History

26-31st July 2013 in Medialab Prado in Madrid
Organised by: Universidad Autónoma de Madrid & Reverso

Keynote by Dr. N. Katherine Hayles – Duke University

DEADLINE: 10th June

 

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MetamediaLab 2013 – Metabody Project – Call for Projects

CALL FOR PROJECTS LINK

MetamediaLab – Metabody Project 2013
Bodynet – How to make a network of bodies
24th-31st July 2013 in Medialab Prado in Madrid

DEADLINE: 10th June

Metabody Conference Series is part of the Metahuman/Metaformance Studies programme of the Metabody Project, that embraces the series of PRESENTATIONS taking part in more than 25 events in more than 15 cities of 11 countries. Metahuman makes reference to the Metahumanist Manifesto, by Jaime del Val and Stefan Lorenz Sorgner, as alternative to posthumians and transhumanism. Metaformance points to the redefinition of perception and relations as form-independent process.

MetamediaLab is the nomadic WORKSHOP module of the Metabody Project

The metabody project is a collaboration of a European consortium of research and culture laboratories including STEIM.

[CFP] TaPRA 2013 | Embodied Engagement: Participatory And Immersive Performance

Performance and the Body Working Group // Performance and New Technologies Working Group

University of Glasgow and The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (RCS)
4th- 6th September 2013

 

The Performance and the Body and Performance and New Technologies Working Groups are joining forces this year to explore different bodily, aesthetic, political, ethical and economical aspects of participation in the current performance milieu. In a performance context where hierarchies of participation are being reconfigured and traditional authorial claims are under stress, new articulations of spectator/performer reciprocity can no longer be disregarded. Focusing on audience experience, we intend to examine possibilities of participant (spectators and performers) agency and empowerment within different modes of performance transaction.
According to Adrian Heathfield, contemporary performance has shifted aesthetically from ‘the optic to the haptic, from the distant to the immersive, from the static relation to the interactive’. The dialogue between the two Working Groups aims to explore the productive tensions between bodies and technologies in the development of this shift. The contested term ‘immersive’ is a rich, under-theorized concept which pulls in and works across distinct constituencies of performance. It calls upon diverse technologies to create its performance environments and promote active bodily engagement. Immersion both as an artistic intention and a perceived process is identified with concepts of viscerality, authenticity and immediacy. Yet the question remains as to how effective immersion can be in engaging audiences mentally, emotionally and corporeally.
Proposals do not need to address both issues of bodies and technologies, but might consider the following issues, though these are not exclusive:

* The bodily risk of participation
* Immersive practices as a democratisation of performance
* Spectator’s authority, authorship and agency in immersive performances
* Discomfort and fear: the ethics of enforced participation
* Sensory inscribed experiences: synaesthetic experiments of flesh
* Soundscapes: the corporeality of immersion
* Ethics of immersion in locative games, mobile interfaces, social media platforms
* Mapping and constructing hybrid, artificial and mixed-media spaces
* Temporalities of immersion
* Embodiment/Disembodiment: game space and everyday life
* Cognitive engagement: willing suspension of disbelief in performance
* ‘Passive’ and ‘active’ audiences
* Political contexts of participatory work
* Empathy and audience engagement
* Intentionality and sensual experience

Proposals
Please send a 300 word proposal, a short biographical statement, and an outline of technical requirements by 29th April 2013 to the working groups convenors.
Proposals, if accepted, may be directed into a range of presentational formats: traditional panels (with 20 minute papers); pre-circulated papers that form the basis for a short presentation and discussion; or, where appropriate, performance-based panels. While we welcome statements of preference, final decisions will be made by the working groups convenors and will be indicated at the time of acceptance.
We welcome alternative, practice-as-research or performative proposals that engage rigorously with the theme, but these must be achievable with limited resources and within a 20-30 minute time period.The convenors of the Performance and the Body Working Group are James Frieze and Lib Taylor. The convenors of the New Technologies Working Group are Martin Blain, Maria Chatzichristodoulou, and Eirini Nedelkopoulou.

 

[Event] Performance Studies Network Second International Conference

4-7 April 2013
Cambridge University

The more musicologically-inclined of you might be interested in some of the papers at the upcoming Performance Studies Network Second International Conference. Particularly:

Nicholas Cook: The Signifying Body: Hendrix, 31 August 1970, 2am
Marilyn Wyers: Shaping phrase: exploring dance movement-supported learning and advanced pianistic training
Linda T. Kaastra and David Kirsh: Embodied creativity in bassoon performance
Murphy McCaleb: Embodied Knowledge: the case of ensemble performance
Naomi Waltham-Smith: Modelling touch in musical performance using the iPad
Mats Kussner: How musicians’ and non-musicians’ approaches to gestural representations of sound and music differ: findings from a motion-capture experiment

Abstracts are available in the conference programme.

[CFP] Performance, the Body and Time in the 21st Century

26-27 June 2013
Hosted by: exist
Project Gallery
Queensland College of Art
Griffith University
226 Grey Street, South Bank Qld 4101

This two-day symposium will explore issues surrounding Performance, the Body and Time in the 21st century. How is the ever-increasing pace of technology generation affecting us as artists and audiences? How have the advances made in the 21st century changed the way we create, the way we consume and how we collaborate?

The premier exist conference will take place 26- 27 June. It will be held at the Queensland College of Art – Project Gallery, Brisbane. The Queensland College of Art, established in 1881, is one of Australia’s longest-running art and design colleges and is situated at Brisbane’s South Bank.

Proposals for papers and presentations are invited which connect with questions on the experience of Performance, the Body and Time in the 21st Century. Possible themes may include:

* Hyper-realism and the experience of time in art
* Performance and the body in time
* Utopia, the sublime, ecstasy and transcendence in art
* Digital performance and the body3d visualization and gaming in art
* Globalization and the singularity of the body in performance
* Development of art materials in the 21st century
* Connecting with digital audiences
* Durational performance in the 21st century
* Two Bodies in Space: Performing as a Duo
* Body Politics in contemporary mediatised performance
* Gender performance in mass-media culture

Conference proceedings will be produced and published online. Abstract proposals (up to 500 words) should be submitted with authors’ details provided separately, so that submissions can be reviewed, blind, by a Conference Review Panel.

Please send your proposal as a Word document attached to an email addressed to exist@live.com.au with subject exist-symposia. Please ensure that your email includes your full name, affiliation, address, email address and phone number (Please DO NOT INCLUDE THESE DETAILS WITH YOUR ABSTRACT).

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: 8th April 2013.

The Conference Review Panel aims to complete the review process by 30th April 2013.

More information here.

Platform: Journal of Theatre and Performing Arts 7.1 ‘On Corporeality’

 

Platform: Journal of Theatre and Performing Arts are happy to announce that 7.1, ‘On Corporeality’, is now available. You can access the free online edition here.

Please also join us for a launch event where you can pick up a free hard copy along with a glass of wine and a 10 minute paper on the journal’s themes from the wonderful Professor Peter Boenisch (University of Surrey). The event will be small and informal and will take place at 11 Bedford Square, Room G3, on Monday 4 March at 6.30pm. Booking is essential. You can book by emailing: platform-submissions@rhul.ac.uk

Articles:

Absent Friends: Edward Bond’s Corporeal Ghosts by James Hudson (University of Lincoln)

Corporeality and Subversion in Post-Renaissance Italy: The Inquisition and the Commedia dell’Arte by Matt Cawson (Royal Holloway, University of London)

The Performance of Biopower and Liveliness: The Life and Death of Terri Schiavo by Renée Newman-Storen (Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts)

Forum Theatre, Disability and Corporeality: A Project on Sexuality in Zimbabwe by Nehemia Chivandikwa and Ngonidzashe Muwonwa (University of Zimbabwe)

‘Try to follow the sound of my footsteps…’: Walking and the Theatricality of Imaginative Geographies in Janet Cardiff’s The Missing Voice (Case Study B), by Jane Frances Dunlop (Independent)

 

[Event] Embodied creativity and improvisation in Hindustani music

IMR South Asian Music and Dance Forum
Thursday 14th February 14:00 – 17.30

Room G22, Senate House, Russell Square, London

14:00 Round Table: “Embodied creativity”
A panel discussion of issues arising from Dard Neuman’s article “Pedagogy, practice, and embodied creativity in Hindustani music”, in the journal Ethnomusicology (56/3, Fall 2012, pp. 426–449).
Speakers: John Baily, Jennie Henley, Viram Jasani, Nicolas Magriel, Nikki Moran, Laudan Nooshin, Frances Shepherd, Chloe Zadeh
Chair: Richard Widdess
Followed by open discussion.

16:00 Break for tea

16:30 Prof. David Clarke (University of Newcastle) “In pursuit of the diachronic: a generative approach to North Indian raga performance.”

All welcome. Delegate fee payable on the door – £5.

[CFP] Journeys Across Media: The Body and The Digital

Postgraduate Conference
Friday 19 April 2013
University of Reading

2013 will mark the 11th anniversary of the annual Journeys Across Media (JAM) Conference for postgraduate students, organised by postgraduates working in the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at the University of Reading. JAM 2013 seeks to focus on and foster current research relating to the Body and the Digital, as today they are interactive and interdependent facets in the media of film, theatre and television; and more widely, in the areas of performance and art. It is a relationship which continues to develop and redefine cinematic, televisual and theatrical practices.

This is a call for postgraduates engaging in contemporary discourses and practices relating to the Body and the Digital, to submit papers or practice-based research for the JAM 2013 Conference. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

  • Interactivity between Digital languages and the Body
  • Sonic Representations of the Body in Digital Performance
  • The Digitized Body in Performance
  • The Role of the Body in Digital Games and Virtual Performance
  • Post-Colonial Bodies in the Contemporary Moment
  • Preparing the Body for Performance
  • Notions of Embodiment (i.e. Violent, Disabled, Explicit)
  • Traditions of Corporeally focused Film, Theatre and Television
  • Embodied Spectatorship or Audiences, and Physicality
  • Phenomenology of the Lived, Performed and Screened Body
  • The Haunted Body
  • Politics of the Body
  • Unconventional and Other Bodies

The body, its presence, perceptions and experience, are becoming increasingly underpinned and influenced by the digital age.  JAM 2013 will endeavour to open a dialogue about the relationship between the body and digital in contemporary scholarship and practice, posing many questions including: How does the body encounter digital media and how do digital media frames position the body – both in mainstream iterations, social media contexts and in art/installation/performance contexts? Furthermore, it will also be worth considering how digital technology has affected the way that humans approach unfamiliar body movement traditions, beyond regional and national borders?

JAM 2013 will provide a discussion forum for current and developing research in film, theatre, television and new media. Previous delegates have welcomed this opportunity to gain experience of presenting their work at different stages of their development, while having the opportunity to meet and form contacts with fellow postgraduate students. Furthermore, participants at JAM 2013 have the possibility of being published in the Journal of Media Practice.

Non-Presenting delegates are also very welcome to attend this conference.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS deadline: 1st February 2013
Please send a 250-word abstract for a fifteen minute paper and a 50-word biographical note to Johnmichael Rossi, Gary Cassidy, Edina Husanovic, Shelly Quirk, Matthew McFrederick at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk .

CALL FOR PRACTICE-BASED WORK deadline: 1st February 2013
Continuing from the success of last year’s JAM 2012 Conference: Time Tells, which experimented with conference structure to include live performances, film screenings and installations taking place throughout the day, we invite artists working in various mediums to propose presentations of their work, relevant to the conference theme. Please send a 250-word outline describing the piece you are proposing to present, as well as duration and any specific technical/space requirements, and a 50-word biographical note. Relevant images and links to your work would also be helpful. As outlined above please e-mail the Conference organisers at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk .

We would appreciate the distribution of this call for papers and wider promotion of this conference through your networks. Journeys Across Media is supported by the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at Reading and the Standing Conference of University Drama Departments.

For further details check out the event’s web page.

[CFP] Frontiers | Music and the Embodied Mind

Music and the Embodied Mind: a jam session for theorists on musical improvisation, instrumental self-extension, and the biological and social basis of music and well-being

Hosted by: Adam M. Croom, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Deadline for Abstract Submissions: 28th February 2013
Deadline for Article Submissions:  31st August 2013

“As animals our lives are marked by rhythms, and the rhythmical activities of ventilation and heart beat are tangible evidence of the life force in each of us”, Taylor and colleagues write in their (1999) Physiological Reviews article on the cardiovascular and respiratory system. With this “life force” as a pulse reverberating deep through the body, it’s as if our heart beat and breath breaks the silence of non-life as rhythms of nature that move us like music. One might ask: Are we not something akin to an instrument of music, our lives, something of an improvisation? What is the nature of the undeniably intimate relationship between music, the body and mind?

Concerns like these have been common to both scholars and performers alike. For instance, Einstein once reported that “I see my life in terms of music” and that “Life without playing music is inconceivable for me”. In Phenomenology of Perception Merleau-Ponty discussed the “kinetic melody” of the body, while the great jazz musician and saxophone improviser Ornette Coleman explained his technique as one of “activating the idea that’s going through my nervous system”. Sally Ness (1992) further discussed “the dynamic mentality of one’s neuromusculature” during her analysis of dance in Body, Movement, and Culture, and the saxophone inventor Adolphe Sax argued that the “true” musician and their music “exist through each other, and are but one”. Advancements in the cognitive sciences have additionally enabled new evidence regarding the bodily basis of music perception, cognition, and action to come to light, inspiring fresh insights and more empirically informed theorizing.

Yet despite a wide and growing interest in the relationship between music, the body and mind, along with promising technological advances, relatively little empirical and theoretical work has been explicitly devoted to investigating the topic of music and the embodied mind, and what work does exist remains largely dispersed across different publication sources spanning different academic fields. Accordingly, the aim of this Research Topic will be to unite an interdisciplinary group of scientists, theorists, and performers to address several of the liveliest questions regarding music and the embodied mind.

Scientists working on music from all disciplines are encouraged to submit original empirical research, philosophers and theorists of music are encouraged to submit fresh hypothesis and theory articles, and musicians as well as dancers are encouraged to submit perspective and opinion pieces reflecting their first-person knowledge of these performing arts. The aim is for an integration of theory, empirical data, and first-person reports in order to better understand, and drive new research on, the topic of music and the embodied mind.

Articles of interest include, but are not limited to, those discussing musical improvisation, self-extension through musical instruments, the evolution and development of music, the biological and social basis of music and well-being, and conceptual frameworks for understanding the nature of music and the embodied mind more generally. Critical commentary will also be warmly received.

Abstract submissions should not exceed 1,000 words and will be carefully selected by the Frontiers editor.

Further information is available from Frontiers.

A small warning: Frontiers journals are open access (good!) of the kind you have to pay to publish in (not so good unless you have a chunky research grant or a very supportive institution!).

[Event] ABA08: Body Waves

Tues 18 Sep 2012
Doors 5:30pm
Performances 6-8pm
Goldsmiths College (Ian Gullard Lecture Theatre, Whitehead Building
– nearest entrance at end of Laurie Grove)
Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW
Entrance fee: donations

Work by Stanier Black-Five and Malcolm Riddoch

Body Waves is a live infrasonic performance whose sounds go beyond the auditory system to be felt in the body. The primary sound source in this exploration of vibroacoustic perception are the unique recordings made by Stanier Black-Five at the epicentre of the recent earthquakes in New Zealand, which capture the vibrations of its massive aftershocks, collapsing buildings and subsequent demolitions. Riddoch will transform this live performance using MaxMSP and digital mixing for quadraphonic spatialization and waveform extrapolation to accentuate lower frequency harmonics. Sinusoidal analysis will be used to convert the waveform data to controllers in order to automate the spatialization with live mixing to balance the enhanced infrasonics. The performance will emphasize somatic feedback to guide the improvisational aspects as the infrasonic soundscape evolves over time. Body Waves is a spatial work indeterminate with respect to performance and spatialized through a quadraphonic set-up to immerse its audience/participants in this visceral music of the body.

If you want to know more, then please trundle on over to ABA’s website.