CFP: Sound and Bodies in the World

The 8th Annual Graduate Music Society Conference
February 28, 2015
Boston University

We live in a world rich with soundscapes. Whether it is produced by bird calls, machines, the string section of an orchestra, or one’s own voice, sound around us reflect the environment we live in. How we choose to interact with sounds often reveals certain ways of being and knowing in the world. Our bodies are the first receivers of sounds, physically encountering sound waves through a multiplicity of sense. How our brains interpret sound is rooted in bodily and cognitive realities; this is especially true of musical sound, which is shaped by context, acoustics, language, and cultural preconditioning.

 

This conference seeks to encourage interdisciplinary conversation between musicological scholarship and areas ranging from sociology, the humanities, environmental and sound studies, and medicine. We encourage proposals exploring the relationship between sound environments and bodily realities, including (but not limited to) issues of gender, race, sexuality, bodily differences and identities, disability, illness, and wellness.

 

We welcome abstracts for tradition 20-minute papers, 5-minute ‘Ignite’ sessions, and poster presentations. Ignite sessions (native to technology and social media communities) essentialize research into a five-minute take accompanied by twenty PowerPoint slides, creating a dynamic, highly focused presentation. (For more information on the Ignite format, contact Jason McCool, jmccool at bu.edu.) Abstracts of no more than 250 words are due January 5th to John Forrestal, johndf at bu.edu.

 

Keynote Speaker: Jennifer Iverson from the University of Iowa

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[CFP] Sound Studies: Mapping the Field – Second International ESSA Conference

Sound Studies: Mapping the Field will be the title of the second international ESSA conference. It will take place at the University of Copenhagen, June 27-29, 2014. Among the themes are: Case studies that testify to the recent changes within sound studies, theoretical reflections on sound studies’ futures, methodological papers testing the inter- or trans-disciplinary approaches of sound studies, historical papers that may help understand and contextualize the current developments, papers addressing how the sound industries take part in the recent developments, sound design futures, and presentations of contemporary artworks that incorporate sounds.

Proposals for panels: February 1

Individual papers: March 15

Keynote speakers are Georgina Born (Oxford University, UK), Norie Neumark (La Trobe University, Australia), Carolyn Birdsall (Amsterdam University, Holland)

Download the call for papers.

[CFP] Fifth International Symposium on Music/Sonic Art: Practices and Theories

26-29 June, 2014
Hochschule für Musik, Karlsruhe –
Institut für Musikwissenschaft und Musikinformatik (IMWI)
Am Schloss Gottesaue 7, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany

Keynote speaker: Rolf Inge Godøy (University of Oslo)

We are pleased to announce the Fifth International Symposium on Music and Sonic Art: Practices and Theories (MuSA 2014), an interdisciplinary event to be held in Karlsruhe, Germany at the Institut für Musikwissenschaft und Musikinformatik (IMWI). MuSA 2014 is also supported by Middlesex University, London.

Proposals for sessions and individual papers for the Fifth International Symposium on Music and Sonic Art: Practices and Theories are invited from academics, independent researchers, practitioners and post-graduate students. Presentation formats include academic research papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion); reports on practice-based/artistic research or educational programmes (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion); and workshops and panel sessions (30 minutes + 15 minutes for discussion). The Symposium committee encourages presentations in which practice forms an integral part of the research. All proposals will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed. The Symposium language will be English.

THEME AND TOPICS:

The principal aim of MuSA 2014 is to advance interdisciplinary investigations in – as well as between – music and sonic art. MuSA 2014 continues to promote this aim by probing the role of embodied approaches through this year’s theme:

exploring embodiment in music and sonic art.

We invite submissions on the following, and other related topics:

• Body movement and emergence of meaning;
• Embodied approaches to creativity;
• Kinematics and haptics as background for music and sonic art    research;
• Gesture and expression;
• Methods for embodied analysis;
• Phenomenology of the performing body;
• The body within socio-cultural contexts of music and sonic art;
• Pedagogical contexts for embodied approaches to music and sonic art;
• The body in interpersonal sound-based communication;
• Ecological, biological, neuroscientific and evolutionary approaches to embodiment;
• Historical roots of embodied approaches in theory and practice;
• Technology and embodiment;
• Critical discourses of embodiment in practice and research;
• Embodied aesthetics;
• Embodiment in collaborative research;

Within the thriving discipline of musical performance studies, there is a
general tendency to speak of ‘the performer’ as an abstract category
without taking into account the kind of musical instrument that mediates
the act of music making and music as a temporally emergent, sounding
phenomenon. In reality, different kinds of musical instruments involve
different expressive means (and at times different expressive/artistic
aims), engender different phenomenologies of performance making, and generate different kinds of performer identities. The nature of the
embodied interaction with different instruments in composition and
performance, and the expressive and communicative meanings that emerge as a result of such interaction constitute a largely unexplored research territory.

The purpose of this one-day event within MuSA 2014 is to re-think the
nature of the relationship between music making and the musical instrument.  Some of the topics that will be explored include:

• The acoustical, musical, cultural, symbolic, and ritualistic
qualities of musical instruments and the relationships between these
(theoretically) distinct kinds of qualities;
• The discourses that exist in relation to musical instruments in
different genres, styles and traditions;
• The gestural affordances and ergonomic principles of musical
instruments and the musical meanings that emerge as a result of these
affordances and principles;
• Performers, improvisers and their instruments: phenomenologies of
music making in the context of particular kinds of musical instruments;
• Composer and instruments: the material, acoustical and expressive
qualities of instruments and their relationship to musical languages
composers create;
• Relationships between creativity in performance, nature of musical
interpretation and musical instruments;
• The role of the musical instrument in the creation of musical
identities;

We invite proposals on any research area related to the nature and use of western acoustical instruments, traditional ethnic instruments and
digital/virtual instruments:

ABSTRACT FORMAT:

Please submit an abstract of approximately 250-300 words as an e-mail attachment to musa2014@btinternet.com

As contributions will be ‘blind’ peer-reviewed, please do not include
information that might facilitate identification from the abstract. In
addition, please include separately the name(s) of the author(s),
institutional affiliation (if any) and short biography (approximately 100
words). Deadline for the receipt of abstracts is Friday, 21 March 2014.
Notification of acceptance will be sent by 15 April.

Please specify whether you wish your abstract to be considered for the
one-day ‘Re-thinking the musical instrument’ event.

REGISTRATION:

The Symposium fees are: €120 for delegates, €100 for presenters and €60 for students and others who qualify for concessions.

 

[CFP] TaPRA 2013 | Embodied Engagement: Participatory And Immersive Performance

Performance and the Body Working Group // Performance and New Technologies Working Group

University of Glasgow and The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (RCS)
4th- 6th September 2013

 

The Performance and the Body and Performance and New Technologies Working Groups are joining forces this year to explore different bodily, aesthetic, political, ethical and economical aspects of participation in the current performance milieu. In a performance context where hierarchies of participation are being reconfigured and traditional authorial claims are under stress, new articulations of spectator/performer reciprocity can no longer be disregarded. Focusing on audience experience, we intend to examine possibilities of participant (spectators and performers) agency and empowerment within different modes of performance transaction.
According to Adrian Heathfield, contemporary performance has shifted aesthetically from ‘the optic to the haptic, from the distant to the immersive, from the static relation to the interactive’. The dialogue between the two Working Groups aims to explore the productive tensions between bodies and technologies in the development of this shift. The contested term ‘immersive’ is a rich, under-theorized concept which pulls in and works across distinct constituencies of performance. It calls upon diverse technologies to create its performance environments and promote active bodily engagement. Immersion both as an artistic intention and a perceived process is identified with concepts of viscerality, authenticity and immediacy. Yet the question remains as to how effective immersion can be in engaging audiences mentally, emotionally and corporeally.
Proposals do not need to address both issues of bodies and technologies, but might consider the following issues, though these are not exclusive:

* The bodily risk of participation
* Immersive practices as a democratisation of performance
* Spectator’s authority, authorship and agency in immersive performances
* Discomfort and fear: the ethics of enforced participation
* Sensory inscribed experiences: synaesthetic experiments of flesh
* Soundscapes: the corporeality of immersion
* Ethics of immersion in locative games, mobile interfaces, social media platforms
* Mapping and constructing hybrid, artificial and mixed-media spaces
* Temporalities of immersion
* Embodiment/Disembodiment: game space and everyday life
* Cognitive engagement: willing suspension of disbelief in performance
* ‘Passive’ and ‘active’ audiences
* Political contexts of participatory work
* Empathy and audience engagement
* Intentionality and sensual experience

Proposals
Please send a 300 word proposal, a short biographical statement, and an outline of technical requirements by 29th April 2013 to the working groups convenors.
Proposals, if accepted, may be directed into a range of presentational formats: traditional panels (with 20 minute papers); pre-circulated papers that form the basis for a short presentation and discussion; or, where appropriate, performance-based panels. While we welcome statements of preference, final decisions will be made by the working groups convenors and will be indicated at the time of acceptance.
We welcome alternative, practice-as-research or performative proposals that engage rigorously with the theme, but these must be achievable with limited resources and within a 20-30 minute time period.The convenors of the Performance and the Body Working Group are James Frieze and Lib Taylor. The convenors of the New Technologies Working Group are Martin Blain, Maria Chatzichristodoulou, and Eirini Nedelkopoulou.

 

[Event] Performance Studies Network Second International Conference

4-7 April 2013
Cambridge University

The more musicologically-inclined of you might be interested in some of the papers at the upcoming Performance Studies Network Second International Conference. Particularly:

Nicholas Cook: The Signifying Body: Hendrix, 31 August 1970, 2am
Marilyn Wyers: Shaping phrase: exploring dance movement-supported learning and advanced pianistic training
Linda T. Kaastra and David Kirsh: Embodied creativity in bassoon performance
Murphy McCaleb: Embodied Knowledge: the case of ensemble performance
Naomi Waltham-Smith: Modelling touch in musical performance using the iPad
Mats Kussner: How musicians’ and non-musicians’ approaches to gestural representations of sound and music differ: findings from a motion-capture experiment

Abstracts are available in the conference programme.

[CFP] Music and Philosopy: Embodiment and the Physical

Call for Papers

Music and Philosophy

3rd Annual Conference of the Royal Musical Association Music and Philosophy Study Group

Department of Music and Department of Philosophy, King’s College London
19-20 July 2013

Deadline for proposals: Friday 8 February 2013

Optional theme: ‘Embodiment and the Physical’

Conference website:

http://www.musicandphilosophy.ac.uk/conference-2013/

[CFP] Sounding Bodies – University of Toronto

 
A Graduate Conference in Music
March 15-6, 2013
Faculty of Music, University of Toronto

Though our musicking (or paper-writing) bodies may appear to be merely a conduit between an idea and its realization, they also delimit fields of possibilities in our various musicking and sounding endeavors. In recent years an increasing attention to the body is reflected in the growth of literature ranging from how social constructs are embodied through singing, to embodied modes of listening; from epistemologies of sound that challenges the mind/body split, to performance practices that prioritize healthy bodily mechanics over notions of technical correctness; from sound as torture, to sound as a way of healing. We seek to put these ideas, many of which transcend boundaries between sub-fields within music, in conversation with one another in this trans-disciplinary conference. How are bodies articulated through various sounding practices? How, on the other hand, do bodies shape our sounding, listening, andmusicking subjectivities? These are some of the questions that guide our thinking towards this conference.

We invite critical engagements, theorizations, ruminations, or performances* (not necessarily musical) on the intersections between sound, music, and bodies from current graduate students in all disciplines. Twenty-minute conference paper presentations (with 10-minute Q and A), or 30-minute performances are welcomed.

Topics include but are by no means limited to:

– Embodied sounding, listening, and musicking practices
– Bodies in performances
– Resonating/ resonant bodies
– Bodies defined, constituted, challenged, articulated, constructed,
or enacted in, by, or through sound
– Gestures and movement in sounding practices
– Embodied musical knowledge and the transmissions thereof
– Bodies healed or destroyed through sound and music
– Any other intersections of sound and body

Submissions for papers or performances, in the form of 300-word abstracts, should be emailed to utgradmusicon13@gmail.com, no later than 23:59 on January 15th, 2013. Please include in the email a  100-word biography of all presenter(s) and audio/video equipment  requests. Decisions will be announced by February 1st, 2013. Further  details can be found here.

[CFP] The Performing Body in the Hollywood Film Musical

The Performing Body in the Hollywood Film Musical:
An Interdisciplinary Symposium

April 4-6, 2013
Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

Call for Papers

Since its emergence in the 1920s, the film musical has woven together utopian visions and cultural realities, simultaneously creating, reflecting, and critiquing contemporary social, political, and economic conditions. Frequently, film musicals communicate these ideologies through the performing bodies of the film’s cast and crew. This symposium will consider the ways in which bodies perform in the film musical, and what such performances signify. Papers are invited that consider the following questions, among others: how do song and dance animate and define bodies onscreen? When and why are performing bodies marked in terms of gender, race, class, sexuality, and when do these bodies remain unmarked? How do onscreen musical and danced performances differ from those bodily performances that remain invisible to audiences, including those of crew members, sideline and film orchestra musicians, vocal and dance doubles, and so on? How do the film musical’s modes of performance both reflect and influence contemporary production practices?

Submissions from across disciplines are encouraged this symposium is intended as a space for scholars from musicology, film studies, dance, theater, and other fields to share their work and consider various disciplinary methodologies and approaches to the genre. We are delighted to welcome three distinguished keynote speakers: Steven Cohan (Syracuse University), Caryl Flinn (University of Michigan), and Adrienne McLean (University of Texas-Dallas).

Proposals for 20-minute papers should include a name, institutional affiliation (if appropriate), and an abstract of no more than 300 words. Please submit all proposals to filmmusicals (at) colgate (dot) edu by December 15, 2013.

For more information, see http://www.colgate.edu/filmmusicals, or by contacting Mary Simonson, Assistant Professor of Film & Media Studies and Women?s Studies at Colgate University, at msimonson (at) colgate (dot) edu.

[Call for Papers/Performances] Remote Encounters

Remote Encounters: connecting bodies, collapsing spaces
and temporal ubiquity in networked performance

ATRiuM, Cardiff School of Creative & Cultural Industries
University of Glamorgan,  Cardiff, Wales.

11th – 12th of April 2013

Since the internet entered the public domain in the early 90’s there
has been an explosion in artistic interest in its use as a means, site
and context for creative practice. Much of this practice is
performative in nature; ether originating from a performance
background and using the internet as a new site and/or augmenting
aspect of that practice or is a form of practice developed as direct
response to the internet and becomes performative to some degree in
its spectatorship.

It has been well established that the internet is not the first or
only example of the use of a networked technology repurposed for
creative practice. There is a clear time line that can be traced back
through the practice of Roy Ascott and his coining of the term
Telematic Art in the 1980’s to artist’s use of satellite networks,
telephone and other telecommunication devices as each were invented.
Seen in this respect the internet can be considered as one of many
networked technologies that has enabled networked performance.

The internet is unique however in that it is not a singular network
type that favours a particular form of media, broadcast or
spectatorship. Most famously known as the network of networks it
enables multiple protocols of which the world wide web’s http is just
one, is multimedia in nature and encourages intertextual folding and
layering of media, is multi-directional not simply a broadcast
communication form, de-centralised in ownership and the majority of
its technologies are openly accessible.

Remote Encounters, a two-day international conference with performance
evening, aims to explore the use of networks as a means to enhance or
create a wide variety of performance arts. How do networks as a site
for performance provide opportunities for us as artists and
performers? In particular how can we remotely collaborate, merge
geographically separate places and times, reconfigure the space of
performance and the relationship between artist and audience?

:: Call for papers and performances ::

Contributions are invited from practitioners and academics for papers
and performances that contextualise current networked performance
themes and issues both historically and across the spectrum of
different types of networks, explore the wealth of performance
opportunities offered by the internet and give a sample of future
directions for networked performance.

Topics may include, but will not be limited to, the following:

Bodies and identity:
– Virtual identities and real bodies;
– Self projection as other;
– Hardware, software and wetware – networked bodies;
– The female body and the remote gaze;
– Gender and role play;
– Robots and cyborgs.

New sites, new narratives, new genre:
– Networks as new sites of opportunism;
– Networked spaces as new territories;
– Transmedia storytelling, new narratives;
– Mixed reality narratives;
– Personal and private spaces as public venue;
– First, second and third person narratives;
– Intertextuality;

The relationship between artist and audience:
– Primary and secondary audiences, local and global;
– Audience as performer;
– Interactive performances and breaking down the fourth wall;
– The transformation of audience to user;
– Strategies and levels of engagement;
– The network as a means for converging and collaborative practice.

Tools and technologies:
– Democratisation of form and presentation;
– Subverting networked communication media;
– Alternative and community based networks;
– Tubes and streams, from public access television to webcasting;
– Virtual worlds and video gaming;
– Social networking as performance;
– Pervasive and locative performance;
– Physical interfaces and feedback;
– Telephony and SMS messaging.

We are particularly interested in live performance proposals, existing
or new, that employ OpenSim and as such could take advantage of a
large space provided by the organisers.

For further details and an informal chat contact Garrett Lynch
(glynch[at]glam[dot]ac[dot]uk) or Inga Burrows
(iburrows[at]glam[dot]ac[dot]uk)

:: Submissions ::

Deadline: 4pm (GMT), Friday 31/08/12

Proposals are now being accepted for paper presentations and live
performances delivered both at the venue and remotely. Your proposal
should take the form of an OpenOffice (.odf), Word (.doc), .pdf
or .rtf document only.

Proposals for papers should include the following:

– An abstract (500 words maximum including bibliography);
– A short bio (200 words maximum);
– Full name and full contact details;
– State whether your proposal is for participation on site or remotely.

Proposal for performances should include the following:

– A description of the work (500 words maximum);
– Accompanying media that may include video, images or sound to give
us an idea of the proposed work provided online or on CD/DVD;
– A short bio (200 words maximum) with examples of previous works
provided online or on CD/DVD;
– Artist(s) / group / performer(s) name and full contact details;
– A full list of required equipment. Note that where possible we will
provide equipment however the event will host several performances so
highly complex configurations and lengthy set-up times cannot be
catered for. Please contact us before making a proposal to discuss
requirements;
– State whether your proposal is for participation on site or
remotely. If remotely performing please also state your networked
environment of choice.

Send proposals to Garrett Lynch:

Email: glynch[at]glam[dot]ac[dot]uk (proposals as zipped attachments
less than 10mb).

Dropbox: https://www.dropbox.com/ (account –
glynch[at]glam[dot]ac[dot]uk)

Post: Garrett Lynch, ATRiuM, Cardiff School of Creative & Cultural
Industries, University of Glamorgan, Adam Street, Cardiff, Wales, CF24
2FN.

:: Conference information ::

Registration:
Early bird fee – academic affiliated £80, non-affiliated £40
Late fee – academic affiliated £100, non-affiliated £50

Full registration details will be announced at a later date.
Attending conference participants will be required to cover their own
travel and if required, accommodation expenses. Travel information as
well as a list of affordable hotels will be posted on the conference
website.

Read more on the conference website: http://remote-encounters.tumblr.com/